Chin Implants

What is chin implant surgery?

The operation to enhance the chin is called a chin augmentation.

This procedure requires very careful planning to achieve a result which is harmonious with the rest of the face. The most common request is to increase the projection of the chin. Since an analysis of facial proportions is very important this surgery is also commonly carried out in conjunction with a rhinoplasty. Occasionally contouring of the neck can enhance the visual profile of the chin and liposuction may be carried out in combination with the chin implant.

What are the types of chin implants?

The commonest type of chin implant is made from a solid form of silicone. Another form of implant is made from a material called Medpore. Mr Chana will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the types of implants carefully at the time of consultation.

What happens during the operation?

Chin implant surgery is carried out under general anaesthesia. There are two ways to insert chin implants. One method involves making an opening inside the mouth in the groove in front of the lower teeth at the bottom of the inside of the lower lip. The other method involves making an incision in the skin just below the chin which results in an external scar. It is usually preferable to avoid a scar but some types of implants may need to be inserted using this method. A pocket is made to allow the implant to lie next to the chin bone and the tissues are closed over the
implant.

What is the recovery?

Pain is surprisingly uncommon after this operation and is easily relieved by mild analgesic tablets which will be prescribed. Aspirin or aspirin like medication (non-­steroidal anti-­inflammatory tablets) must not be taken.

In the event of an incision being made inside the mouth the stitches are dissolvable. After surgery you should be able to eat and drink normally. However, you must be careful not to pull the lip forward and to brush your teeth carefully with a very small toothbrush. There is usually very minimal bruising and swelling.

What are the risks?

Serious complications following chin implant surgery are rare. Infection is the main potential risk and you will be given antibiotics during the procedure and for a few days after the surgery. In the very rare event of an infection the only treatment is for the implant to be removed and then repeat surgery carried out at a later date.

Mr Chana will provide you with a comprehensive information leaflet following consultation.

© Jag Chana 2014